But deliver us from evil (OF10)

Every Christian who earnestly seeks to follow God can expect Satan to attack and tempt them. Desire and opportunity are closely tied to one another when it comes to giving in to temptation. We may experience Satan as either strongly tempting us or using more subtle methods. We must stand firm and tell Satan to go away. It may appear he has power, but we have the obligation to rebuke him ‘in Jesus’ name.’ The name of Jesus is very powerful. 

A person may have a built-in tendency or desire towards a particular sin, but they may not have the opportunity. When the desire is there along with the opportunity, that’s what can lead to sin. When Jesus was in the desert being tempted, the opportunity was there, but not the desire. Where are your desires and opportunities toward sin?

Copyright © 2015 by Theresa M. Williams

And lead us not into temptation (OF9)

This phrase can be confusing. We are praying to our Lord, and He never leads us into temptation. So, what’s this phrase all about? Our Lord may, at times, permit Satan to tempt us. I think this part of the Our Father is asking for God’s help and common sense when we are tempted. If we know we are weak in a certain area, then we must do our part in avoiding those situations. For example, in the Bible where King David saw Bathsheba bathing, it should have gone no further. But by continuing to look at her, a beautiful woman, he fell into sin and committed adultery.

In modern times, a man who knows he struggles with pornography knows he needs to avoid strip clubs and adult video stores. He must avoid going anywhere near those types of places, because if he does go there, he is setting himself up for a fall (into sin). This is just one example.

Identify your own weak spot(s). How can you avoid these occasions of sin? The first step is asking God for the grace to avoid them in the first place. Let Him guide you so you can draw closer to Him.

Copyright © 2015 by Theresa M. Williams

Thy will be done (OF4)

Are we really serious about doing God’s will? Or do we perceive something as God’s will, start acting on it, and hope God blesses it? Is it ‘thy will be done’ or ‘my will be done?’ God is not a genie in a lamp or a fairy godmother, granting our wishes on a whim. He is a loving father who knows what’s best for us. He sees the entire picture, that which we cannot see. He is interested in our salvation, and sometimes what we want is not good for us at this time or maybe ever. God knows our hearts and what will draw us to Him. He knows what is needed for our salvation. He knows our weaknesses and our temptations. It could be that maybe the thing(s) we seek will push us farther away from Him or lead to self-sufficiency, relying on ourselves instead of God. What this phrase of the Our Father is really all about is trusting God in everything. The opposite of trust is worry or suspicion. Do we trust that God will get our lives ‘right?’ Are we willing to do what God asks of us? If something has happened to you that you do not understand, talk to Jesus as you would a friend. Tell him your troubles, and He will listen. If you listen back, you may hear His whisperings in your heart. Be still and know that He is God.

Copyright © 2015 by Theresa M. Williams

Intro to the Our Father

The Our Father Prayer

Our Father who art in Heaven,
Hallowed be Thy name;
Thy kingdom come
Thy will be done
On earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread;
And forgive us our trespasses
As we forgive those who trespass against us;
And lead us not into temptation,
But deliver us from evil.

I am going to unpack the Our Father (OF) prayer piece by piece in the following posts. The Our Father is such a familiar prayer, I think at times we don’t always stop to think about what we’re saying. I know my mind sometimes wanders, and maybe yours does too. I hope these posts bring more meaning (for you) to this beautiful prayer.

Copyright © 2015 by Theresa M. Williams