Boosting our self-image

Okay, so let’s say we have identified this issue of inferiority, poor self-esteem or insecurity. How do we go about boosting or repairing our self-image?
– One way is positive self-talk. We tell ourselves positive things, such as:
– I am a good person.
– I am worthy of God’s love.
– As long as I repent of (be sorry for) my sins/misdeeds, God will take me back despite my many sins. After all, if I had been the only human on earth, He still would have died for me, He loves me that much! He will help me with my struggles.
– God has not abandoned me.

Of course, one pitfall is that we want to avoid reinforcing qualities or things about ourselves that may NOT be true unless we are working towards bettering ourselves in that area. For example, we can’t spell well or every time we try to sing we are off key (out of tune). However, if we are working on an area we may not excel in or be good at (just yet), like being patient or being able to spell well, we can encourage ourselves by stating what we want to be, i.e. “I will be a patient person.” By reiterating positive things, we may actually come to believe it and therefore make it come true for us, but we also have to work at that thing we have trouble with in order for this technique to be effective. Without belief and action, the change we want won’t take place.

Disclaimer: These techniques may not work for everyone who reads this or whoever puts these things into practice. Remember that change takes time. You may need specialized help, but this is one possible way to start.

Copyright © 2015 by Theresa M. Williams

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Unemployment Entombment Resource

A friend of mine gave me a copy of a pamphlet from Our Sunday Visitor called Employment Rosary. Please click to view. https://www.osvparish.com/Shop/PDFs%5CP1144_web.pdf.The first two paragraphs is how the pamphlet begins. Below that and the ‘closing prayer,’ there is a brief description of the mystery, then a prayer followed by a meditation. To find this helpful, you don’t have to know how to pray the rosary or be Catholic. I encourage you to check it out!

“Prayer has power. Whether we pray for ourselves or intercede on behalf of another, prayer helps hold together what seems in danger of breaking down in our society, our families, our spirits, and ourselves.

These are frightening times; any one of us can suddenly find ourselves out of work, or unable to meet bills and obligations because a family member’s paycheck has vanished. When we are overwhelmed by loss, displacement, anxiety, and very real fear, prayer brings us back in balance.

CLOSING PRAYER:

Lord Jesus, help us to remember that a thousand ages in your sight are as an evening past – no more than a “watch in the night” (Ps 90:4). Days begin and days end, and no situation goes on forever. Help us to endure hardships in the trust that these difficult days, too, will pass. In you we find infinite understanding, infinite consolation, infinite hope. Your angels say, “Be not afraid.” Help us to remember that your time of trial ended with the tearing of the Temple veil and the rolling back of the stone; our time of trial, too, will end in hope.

Through you, with you, in you, there is nothing to be afraid of. Amen.”

Excerpt(s) from Employment Rosary © Our Sunday Visitor Publishing. 1-800-348-2440. http://www.osv.com. Used by permission. No other use of this material is authorized. To order, please contact Our Sunday Visitor.

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Blog copyright © 2015 by Theresa M. Williams

Entombment of Unemployment

At one time or another, most of us have suffered the entombment of unemployment. Our reactions can vary from anxiety, betrayal, embarrassment, fear, grief, feeling overwhelmed, poor self-esteem, self-consciousness, vulnerability, and even anger. We long to feel valued, loved, and relevant.

In Romans 5:7-8 (NRSV), Christ assures us that we ARE relevant, valued and loved by Him:

Indeed, rarely will anyone die for a righteous person—though perhaps for a good person someone might actually dare to die. But God proves his love for us in that while we still were sinners Christ died for us.

It’s very tempting to lose heart during our search for employment.  But we are assured concerning God’s presence and His plans for us:

Isaiah 41:10 (NRSV)

do not fear, for I am with you, do not be afraid, for I am your God; I will strengthen you, I will help you, I will uphold you with my victorious right hand.

Jeremiah 29:11

For surely I know the plans I have for you, says the Lord, plans for your welfare and not for harm, to give you a future with hope.

 

Be of good courage. Just as Jesus rose from the dead, He will raise us up out of the tomb of our unemployment!

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Blog copyright © 2015 by Theresa M. Williams

Jesus the Servant

Holy Week is just around the corner, and I’m sure a lot of you are familiar with the scripture passage about Jesus’ washing His disciples’ feet. I am reminded of a song that we sing in our choir entitled “The Servant Song.” The song is quite beautiful and moving. (For copyright reasons, I cannot quote you the exact words.) Kevin and I had sung it a number of times before we learned that this song is sometimes sung at weddings. We truly had not thought of it being used in that way, but we realized how appropriate it was. The song asks if you will let me be your servant, be as Christ to you. Then the composer asks for the grace to let others serve him. It tells how we travel this earthly journey together, and we are here to help each other in whatever way that we can. We can encourage others, give them comfort in their fear. It speaks of sharing our joys, fears, sorrows and laughter until we’ve seen our earthly journey through.

It’s very humbling to have someone else do things for us, to let them ‘serve’ us. It requires swallowing our pride. Do you recall St. Peter’s reaction to Christ washing his feet? At first, he wouldn’t let Jesus do it. Only after Christ explained why He was doing it did Peter let Him. Will we let others serve us when it is appropriate and needed or will we be stubborn and prideful, deny others the opportunity? Christ never meant us to walk this life alone. That’s why He gave us each other. So, let’s walk the journey together as companions, travelers on the road of life.

Copyright © 2015 by Theresa M. Williams