That’s What Love Looks Like

A woman patiently helps her husband guide his walker down the aisle… That’s what love looks like.

 A caregiver is attentively feeding someone with a severe disability… That’s what love looks like.

 A receptionist waves good morning to a lonely old man going to work next door… That’s what love looks like.

 A friend patiently listens to some distress at work and offers to pray… That’s what love looks like.

 A husband with other plans stays home with a sick wife to help and support her… That’s what love looks like.

 A clergyman cries with a parishioner in their emotional pain… That’s what love looks like.

 A male classmate closes a window when someone feels a draft (even though he doesn’t understand why)… That’s what love looks like.

 Someone challenges her friend when she puts herself down… That’s what love looks like.

 Friends support one another when one of them is having a bad day, helping them talk through their difficulty and offering emotional support… That’s what love looks like.

Parents laugh and play with their firstborn child, a daughter with Down Syndrome… That’s what love looks like.

 A fellow immigrant offers to attend a series of classes she doesn’t have to attend to translate for her community… That’s what love looks like.

Co-workers find out one of their own walks a long distance to/from work. They and their managers get that worker his own transportation… That’s what love looks like.

These may not be the most dramatic examples of what love looks like, but there IS one:

 An innocent man is crucified between two thieves. He is Jesus Christ on the cross, and He died in our place for our sins… That’s what love looks like!

 Blog copyright © 2017 by Theresa M. Williams

 

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Questions for Jesus

My reflection that follows comes after singing “Mary Did You Know?” from our Christmas program. In this song, the songwriter asks Mary how much she knew about what Jesus would do in His life. I recently heard someone pose the question: “If you sat next to Jesus on a bus, what would you ask Him? What would you talk about?” These are some of the questions I’d ask:

How much and when did Mary tell you about the circumstances of your birth? The shepherds? The magi? Did she mention the gifts they brought and what those gifts represent? I know the story of the little drummer boy might be a legend, but what would you think about him playing for you at your birth?

Did you think it odd living in Egypt? Or were you too little to remember that time in your life? Did Mary and Joseph tell you why you lived there? How did you feel about that? What was it like to move back to the land of your birth? How did people react to you coming back? Were you treated differently from other boys? If so, how? When did you realize you were different from other children?

What was it like to learn carpentry from Joseph? Did you ever accidentally hit your thumb with a hammer? As a carpenter, what was the most difficult or challenging item you ever made? When and how did Joseph die? How did this affect you and Mary?

Besides your baptism, did you have much contact with John the Baptist?

Oh, the many questions we could ask Jesus. If you were on a bus with Jesus, what would you want to ask Him? Would it be about some practical aspect of His hidden life as mentioned above, or would it be something different? What are you curious about?

Copyright © 2016 by Theresa M. Williams

Only A Shadow of Your Joy

I’m not really a major-league baseball fan. I like baseball; I just don’t watch it, not even the World Series. Last night, the Chicago Cubs won the World Series! (For those of you not aware, the World Series is to major league baseball what the Super Bowl is to professional football.) So what, you say. The Cubs haven’t won the championship since 1908, more than 100 years ago! Perhaps because I don’t have a favorite pro baseball team, along with the fact that I like to root for the underdog (at least sometimes), I can share a small portion of the Chicago Cubs’ joy at finally winning the World Series. To be a Cubs fan must be very special, right now especially. To be a fan through the ‘drought’ of those many years, now to rejoice in their victory, must be a high joy indeed. One fan, a woman, said she cried after it happened, no doubt tears of joy. You’ve heard of people being on ‘cloud 9’ or in ‘7th heaven,’ this must be ‘off the charts’ for the team and their loyal fans.

Imagine for a moment you’re God. The Cleveland Indians are ahead three games to one. You know the Cubs are going to come back and win it. What a special surprise is in store for Cubs fans. It reminds me of the words to a song: “The joy I have today my Lord is only a shadow of Your joy for me…’ Wow! I don’t know what else to say except I can be a real emotional softie at times. My heart rejoices with them. Congratulations Cubs team and fans. It’s been a long-time coming. Your faithfulness and patience have been rewarded. By the way, the words after the … are ‘if I but follow You.’ If we follow you Lord, our faithfulness (to you) will be rewarded too.

Copyright © 2016 by Theresa M. Williams

Mischievous Chris

Several years ago, a gentleman named Chris came to work at our company as an intern over the summer. He was so disabled from cerebral palsy that a caregiver came in daily. Chris was in a motorized wheelchair and wore a leather strap around his head called a ‘halo’ so he could type on the keyboard. It was pretty sad. I was uncomfortable around Chris for quite a while. I simply had no experience with someone with cerebral palsy, their slurred speech, involuntary movements, etc. I discovered that Chris had a cheerful spirit and a good outlook on life in spite of his disability. I never heard him complain.

I simply must tell you about an incident where Chris was very mischievous. Another co-worker, Mike, was a serious individual who had a bad car accident a few months prior that left his back compromised. One day when Mike stepped away from his desk, Chris noticed, turned to me with a huge grin on his face, and laughed mischievously. Oh, man. What was he going to do? I was afraid if Chris pulled a prank on Mike, that Mike would get mad, because he could be pretty intense. Chris went up to the back of Mike’s chair and pulled it towards his desk with his feet, motioning for me to be quiet. I played along with Chris’ prank, and when Mike returned to his desk, I pretended nothing was wrong. Finally, Mike found out what Chris had done. Now what? How would Mike react? Mike seemed surprised and even amused at Chris’ prank. He wasn’t upset or anything. He got his chair back, and all was well.

I was relieved Mike took the prank so well, and the incident seemed to strengthen the friendship Chris and I had started to develop. In the short time he was with us, Chris won me over with his cheerful, upbeat nature. He was a delight to be around, and it challenged me to not take myself, or life, so seriously. With Chris’ help, I was finally able to look past his disabilities and my discomfort. I still think of Chris from time to time, and I hope he’s doing well. I wish I could say I have been cured of being too serious, for that is not the case. But, I am learning slowly, and I guess that’s really what matters.

Copyright © 2016 by Theresa M. Williams

Transfigure us, oh Lord

The word transfiguration is defined three ways: 1) A complete change of form or appearance into a more beautiful or spiritual state. 2) Christ’s appearance in radiant glory to three of His disciples (Matthew 17:2, Mark 9:2-3, Luke 9:28-36). 3) The church festival commemorating this.

A few weeks ago, our choir sang a special song for the Feast of Christ’s transfiguration. It’s a pretty song that I can’t get out of my head. It talks about breaking the chains that bind us and following where Christ leads us. This song is appropriate for other days in Lent as well, not just for that feast. Isn’t being transfigured or transformed really what Lent’s all about anyway? I will concentrate this article regarding the first definition above with an emphasis on “a more beautiful or spiritual state.”

Lent gives us a focused opportunity to be transfigured into an improved spiritual state by more prayer, fasting, and almsgiving. I like to refer to spiritual improvement as “polishing our halos!” A halo is a disk or circle of light surrounding or above the head of a saint or holy person to represent their holiness. Our light from our halos gets dimmed by our sins, so we have to ‘polish’ ourselves spiritually to let our light of holiness shine. Matthew 5:14-16 states: You are the light of the world. A city built on a hill cannot be hidden.  No one after lighting a lamp puts it under the bushel basket, but on the lampstand, and it gives light to all in the house.  In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father in heaven.

There are lots of other manners in which we can be transfigured. We can make use of the sacrament of reconciliation. We can break ourselves of some bad spiritual habits. We can read the Bible and listen to what our Lord is trying to say to us through it. We can offer to help someone carry their cross by becoming a prayer partner with them for their intentions, needs, and struggles/difficulties. Maybe you can think of some other ways to be transfigured.

Some questions to ponder: How has my halo gotten dimmed by sin? How am I being transfigured this Lent? How can I let my light shine brighter for others? Have a fruitful Lent!

Copyright © 2016 by Theresa M. Williams

PRAYER FOR DAILY LIFE

Jesus be my friend and

Help me to be a friend.

Guide me when I’m unsure;

Strengthen me against temptation.

Give me courage to shine

Your light within me for all to see.

When I’m afraid and anxious,

Please send Your Spirit to

Calm and comfort me.

I know you would never leave me,

But I am Your child who needs

Loving reassurance at times.

Father, teach me Your ways.

Please be patient.

Sometimes the lessons are not easy.

Help me to be the gift to this world

That You intend me to be.

When my mission is complete,

May this world be better for my having been here. Amen.

Theresa Marie Williams © Copyright1994

Some Modern-Day Beatitudes

Blessed are they who don’t take themselves too seriously, for they shall be free to laugh at their foibles.

Blessed are the compassionate, for the compassion shown will return to them.

Blessed are the politically incorrect, for they shall be free to tell it like it is.

Blessed are the organized, for they shall make better use of their time.

Blessed are they who are not anxious about the future, for they shall be free to enjoy the present moment.

Blessed are they who don’t worry, for they trust God to help them with their challenges.

Copyright © 2016 by Theresa M. Williams